Mitchell Yancey  - Free Man of Color

 

An interesting find for anyone researching African American Yanceys (read below)

This info came from: http://www.historicalshop.com/sitecontents/africanamerican/aahist.htm
click on the image below to see larger image of certificate.
 

Note a Mitchell Yancey listed on this page:
http://cemeterycensus.com/nc/gran/cem369.htm
 

And also a Mitchell Yancey in the Yancey Database:
 
 

A RARE VIRGINIA STOCK CERTIFICATE ISSUED TO A FREE MAN OF COLOR IN 1860 THAT WAS TAKEN FROM THE VIRGINIA TREASURY BY A UNION CHAPLAIN ON THE SURRENDER OF RICHMOND IN 1865 WITH A SECTION OF THE LAST CSA FLAG FLYING OVER RICHMOND

8280 - A most unusual Confederate bond, a Commonwealth of Virginia State Stock (in red) (Criswell #61A), July 14, 1860, incredibly made out to: "Mitchell Yancey a free man of color..." The bond, recovered from the Confederate Treasury only days after the city fell, bears an attached 2" X 8" section of the last flag to fly over the Confederate capitol building. The flag had been captured by American soldiers and divided among them with Union Chaplain John O. Foster, the first Union chaplain to preach a sermon in the newly - "liberated" city, also receiving a section of the huge flag. This stock certificate, along with many other stocks and bonds, were taken from the Confederacy Treasury only days after the city fell by Foster, who had been present at Richmond's capitulation, and his visit to the Treasury is noted in his diary. Foster also noted that the section of fabric he had obtained had been part of the Confederate flag that had flown over the Confederacy's capitol building. Some staining at right with a weak, somewhat brittle fold thereat, hand-cut with uneven margins (as is usually the case), still quite good. Documents included picture Foster's note showing the flag's origin, with additional copies of his diary transcript, biography, analysis of the flag material, and so on. Our genealogical research shows that according to the 1880 census, a mulatto named Mitchell Yancey was born ca. 1834, most likely in Virginia, and in 1880 was employed as a "Waiter in Family." He was married to "Charlot" and had four children between the ages of 7 and 21. His two sons were listed as being a Servant and a Porter in the 1880 census. Born in 1834 Mitchell was 26 when he purchased this bond in 1860. The census of 1850 showed a Benjamin Mitchell Yancey [1809-1901] owning 14 slaves in Virginia. It is quite possible that this Mitchell Yancey was a son of the above slave owner and was emancipated by his father when he became 21. It is interesting to speculate where Mitchell received $400 to invest in the State of Virginia stock certificate paying 6% interest. It was possibly money given to him on his emancipation by his father or money he earned during his early years of freedom. How it was found in the Virginia Treasury in 1865 is another question. Possibly due to the war Yancey redeemed his stock for Confederate notes or bonds. Nevertheless this certificate is rare to begin as far as Virginia financial instruments are concerned and being issued to a FREE BLACK MAN and being glued to a piece of the last Confederate flag taken off the state capital increases its rarity and value significantly. This bond catalogued $300 in Criswell in 1980 and is rated Rarity 9. Bond comes with the entire provenance of the finding of the bond and application to the flag remnants by Chaplain Foster, possibly an unique example.........................................................SOLD