Joseph Trotter Yancey Family

Photo & info from Bob Juch

Other documents
Mexican War Papers,    Other records


Joseph Trotter "Joe" YANCEY was camera shy. The male is his son, Robert Lee YANCEY. I know that's Louisa in the middle, but we're missing one girl. Perhaps Kate or Belle. And where's Frank? Perhaps he had died. Anna Joaquina Ortiz was born 1840 in Sonora, Mexico, and died May 23, 1927 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., California. She married Joseph Trotter Yancey (b. 1824, Pulaski, Tenn.; d. Sept. 3, 1904, Los Angeles, Calif.) September 3, 1859 in Santa Cruz, Sonora, Mexico, son of Tryon Yancey and Louisa Flournoy. Children of Anna Ortiz and Joseph Yancey are:

i. . Robert Lee2 Yancey, born May 14, 1864 in Sonora, Mexico; died Bef. 1933.

ii. Louisa "Lula" Yancey, born December 08, 1866 in Tucson, Pima Co., Arizona; died March 11, 1966 in Julian, San Diego Co., California. She married Arthur Earnest Juch June 27, 1886 in Julian, San Diego Co., California.

iii. Frank N. Yancey, born November 1869 in California; died Bef. October 17, 1902.

iv. Adella "Della" Yancey, born June 22, 1872 in Julian, San Diego, California. She married Wilbur Fremont Blake October 17, 1894 in San Diego, San Diego, California.

v. Mary J. Yancey, born December 08, 1874 in California. She married M. De Arnaz.

vi. Anita J. Yancey, born August 31, 1877 in San Diego, San Diego, California.

vii. Belle Yancey, born Aft. 1880 in California; died Bef. October 17, 1902. She married Houle.

viii. Edna E. Yancey, born March 17, 1880 in California. She married Otero.

ix. Kate O. Yancey, born September 02, 1883 in California.

 

 

Information from Robert Juch

Joseph Trotter Yancey [scrapbook] 1, 2 (Tryon Milton ) was born 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 Oct 1823 in Pulaski, Giles Co., TN. He died 10 3 Sep 1904 in National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Sawtelle, Los Angeles, CA and was buried 11, 12 in Plot 10 G-1, National Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA.

Joseph emigrated 13 about 1828 from Pulaski, TN to Holly Springs, Marshall Co., MS. He served in the military 14 Sgt., Taylor's Co., 1st MS Volunteers 15 Jun 1846 - 24 Nov 1846 in Vicksburg, MS to Mexico. He was employed mounted policeman 1850 in Los Angeles, CA. He emigrated Oct 1854 from Los Angeles to Sonoita, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He deeded land 15 160 acres adjoining Tubac on the south 12 Apr 1858 in Tubac, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He had incident: "Indians took eleven mules from Mr. Yancy, at Tubac, and being pursued, lanced three mules." 3 Mar 1859 in Tubac, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He had incident: "On the night of the 5th inst., two pack animals were taken from Mr. Yancy, at Tubac, by Apaches, and two days after retaken from the Apaches by the Papagues. Within the past twenty months Mr. Yancy has had over a hundred mules stolen by Indians." 10 Mar 1859 in Tubac, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He deeded land 16 sold 6 acres 4 May 1859 in Tubac, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He had incident: "On the afternoon of Thursday, the 29th ult. [Sep. 29th] the Arivaca Ranch, the property of the Sonora Exploring and Mining Company, was visited by and band of Apaches. ... Mr. Yancey of Tubac, lost a valuable mule..." 6 Oct 1859 in Arivaca Ranch, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 17 1860 in Tucson, Pima Co., AZ. He was employed 18 Trader, $2500 personal estate 3 Aug 1860 in Tucson, Pima Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 19 1862 in Agua Frio, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 20 1864 in Tucson, Pima Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 21 1866 in Agua Frio, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 22 1867 in Sacaton, Pinal Co., AZ. He was counted in a census 23 1870 in Warner's Rancho Dist., San Diego Co., CA. He was counted in a census 24 1880 in Agua Caliente Twp., San Diego Co., CA. He was employed 24 teamster 1880 in Agua Caliente Twp., San Diego Co., CA. He was counted in a census 25 Jun 1900 in Vanderbilt Twp., San Bernardino Co., CA.
Joseph married 1 Anna Joaquina Ortiz [scrapbook] "Annie" 2, daughter of Ignacio Ortiz and Francisca Villanueva, on 3 Sep 1859 in Tubac, AZ. Annie was born 3, 4, 5 Nov 1840 in Tubutama, Sonora, Mexico and was christened 17 Dec 1840 in Tubutama, Sonora, Mexico. She died 6 23 May 1927 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles Co., CA from cerebral hemorrhage and was buried 7 in Calvary Cemetery, East Los Angeles, CA.

Annie was counted in a census 8, 9 1860 in Tucson, Pima Co., AZ. She was counted in a census 10 1862 in Agua Frio, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. She was counted in a census 11 1866 in Agua Frio, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. She was counted in a census 12 1867 in Tubac, Santa Cruz Co., AZ. She was counted in a census 13 1870 in Warner's Rancho Dist., San Diego Co., CA. She was counted in a census 14 1880 in Agua Caliente, San Diego, California. She was counted in a census 5 1900 in 312 Adams St, Phoenix, Maricopa Co., AZ. She resided 15 about 1900 in Globe, Gila Co., AZ. She resided 16 about 1901 in Albuquerque, Bernalillo Co., NM.

The Yancey Juch Families

By Louisa Yancey Juch

             Traveling was a slow and laborious undertaking in the 1800s when my mother came across the desert country with two small children, my brother Bob and I, via covered wagon drawn by oxen, alternating with horses. My father, Joseph Yancey, a southerner, born and reared in Tennessee had preceded us by perhaps a year. We, my mother, brother and I came out with a caravan consisting of about from ten to fifteen wagons. Several armed men on horseback rode as guards.

            I was too young to remember much of anything, not quite two years of age. My brother Bob being three years my senior remembered some of the occurrences that took place during the journey and me not wanting to be outdone imagined I could remember as much as he could. To add insult to injury, soon after starting out on the pilgrimage, Bob and I were attacked with whooping cough in a severe form. What a trial for my poor mother. We started from Tucson, Arizona Territory late in July landing in the Julian area (not named yet) the later part of October.

            We encountered many obstacles that caused delay. Heavy thunder storms would wash away miles of the shoestring road completely, thus holding up progress to rebuild and repair said road.

            It was frequently necessary to make camp for a week at a time to allow the tired and footsore animals to rest. Also for the weary population to rest and make repairs and preparations for resuming the journey.

            Apache Indians were a source of apprehensive terror while traveling through the Apache infested territory. Although we were not attacked we encountered in small numbers a band of four or five. If the stock was not carefully guarded they would drive off several head of both horses and cattle.

            At Fort Yuma the caravan disbanded. Only a few of the wagons proceeded this way, coming as far as the old Butterfield Stage Station at Vallecito. From there, the small caravan, after resting for several days, proceeded on to San Bernardino and Los Angeles Counties.

            We were met at the Butterfield Station by my father who brought us to what is now Julian. We camped in an old cabin somewhere in the Whispering Pines district. During the winter or early spring we returned to the Butterfield Station where we lived for about two years.

            We then went to Santa Ysabel where my father was engaged in hay and grain farming for a short time. We then returned to Julian where we remained and in the course of time another brother Frank had come into the family, followed by five little sisters, namely Lola or Nella, Maymie, Nita, Edna, and Belle, making us a family of eight children. Eventually my sisters and brothers were grown and decided to leave Julian and take up residence in other parts of the State. Our mother going also while I remained here.