DANIEL WOOD PRIVATE SCHOOL

Daniel Wood arrived in Salt Lake Valley July 23, 1848. He built a log house on the Heber C. Kimball Mill Farm in 1848, was not pleased with the soil and moved west two miles. He took the advise of Indians by his choice of land. In spring of 1850 he got a surveyor who surveyed 100 acres for Daniel to take up. Daniel built an adobe house sixteen feet by thirty-two feet, two stories high, finished about December 1, 1850. He planted trees each year for an orchard, till there was five acres.

He began keeping individual school for his family in 1854, with only six scholars. In the year 1862 he started building his family meeting house and finished it in 1863. During all this time he let his team go to the mountains, and hired a man to drive to help bring in the Handcart Pioneers who were suffering hardships.

MINUTES OF A SCHOOL EXAMINATION HELD IN THE 12 DISTRICT SCHOOL on July 3, 1863. By Charles E. Peason, copied from Book 2, p. 61.

At 2 p.m. the School Bell was rung and the scholars immediately afterward entered in single file to the Examination Room. A Hymn was then sung, and prayer offered by Brother Wood. The teacher, Brother C. E. Peason then arose and said he had expected to have had the pleasure of introducing Brother Campbell the examiner of common schools for the Territory of Utah, but that unfortunately he was unable to attend. He then proceeded to examine the Scholars. The program was as follows: 1-Class Reading class (Bibles) and Question Class (Do) 2- Class reading Chapters, 3-Readers, Questions and spelling class in (Do). 3rd Class Reading ch., 2nd questions and spelling. Jr. Reading class, General Spelling class, Geography Class, Grammar Class, Writing class, Books examined; Arithmetic on Black Board, Long Division,

Tables-Multiplication, English Money, U.S. Money, Troy Weight, Avoirdupois weight, Long Measure, Cloth measure, Square or land measure, time and astronomer table, days of Month; The Ten Commandments.

PART TWO - I Wish I Was In Dixie sung. Single Recitation - The Little Girl and Her Lame Brother by Phoebe J. Clark - Summer by Ann June Peel - Speak the Truth by Martha J. Clark - The Peacock by Melvina Wood - The Times-Tables by Celestine J. Wood - Try, Try Again by Amelia Wood - The Last Nestlings by George Wood - The Guide Post by James Wood - The Thunder Storm by Peter Wood - The Little Lord the Tanner by Heber Wood -The Boy and Butterfly by Dela Wood.

PART THREE song - Gentle Annie. Part Recitations - The SeasonsSpringtime by Phoebe J. Clark - Summer by Martha S. Clark - Autumn by Ann J. Peel - Winter by Melvina Wood. All the Season by Celestea Janet Wood. THE PLANT Mother by Ann J. Peel, Daughter by Martha S. Clark. 'Grandfather's Story. Grandfather by James Wood, Little Girl by Melvina Wood. THE LITTLE PHILOSOPHER Mrs. Lennox by Heber Wood, Peter Handle by Peter Wood. THE TRADES OR COLONISTS Mr. Barlow by Charles E. Peason, Fame by Daniel Wood, Miller by James Wood, Carpenter by Heber Wood, Blacksmith by Peter Wood, Mason by George Wood, Shoemaker by Daniel Wood, Taylor by James Wood, Silver Smith by Heber Wood, Doctor by Daniel Wood, Barber by George Wood, Lawyer by James Wood, School Master by Heber Wood, Soldier by Heber Wood, Dancing Master by Daniel Wood, Editor by James Wood, Gentlemen by Peter Wood.

PART FOUR. Song and Recitations composed for the occasion by the teacher, C. E. Pearson. 1- The song Two Greenbacks, on the travels of a greenback. 2- The following recitation by Heber Wood.

We have studied our lessons and spelled well today
So Master must give us a few days to play..
We've recited ciphered written copies so plain
For tood.[sic] approbation as well as our gain
And now to the visitors allow me to say
I hope you've enjoyed yourselves, I wish you good day.

The following recitation by Melvina Wood.

For the instruction I pardon ask
And beg leave to finish out my task.
And say for those who with me learn
The boys shall the merit earn.
Tho they are the head, we are under
Yet we'll try and not make many blunders.
And if the Prize we do not merit,
For Good behavior give us credit.

The following recitation by Nephi Wood

These great folks all their time have had
To forget the little ones would be too bad.
For though we're small and undersize
Some-day we'll carry off a prize.
And if the teacher will stay and teach
Arithmetic and parts of speech,
We'll promise to behave our best
And learn as fast as all the rest.

PART FIVE. Song - The Lovely Wonder, After which the teacher arose with a few appropriate remarks, presented a fancy lead pencil to each of the following scholars. For best Arithmetic; Daniel C. Wood. Best General Scholars, First Phoebe J. Clark. Second Ann J. Peel, Third Martha S. Cl.ark, and for best behavior Melvina Wood.

Brother Archer then arose and said, I feel highly gratified at what I have heard and seen today. I feel to encourage the children. They may perhaps think their teacher is hard with them sometimes, but I don't think he is a hard master. He is obliged to be strict with them to keep order in the school and to get them along. Amen.

Brother Daniel Wood then rose and said, I do not intend to make many remarks, but I can say that I try to mind my own business. I am willing to receive council from those who have right to give it. I do not know how my neighbors like my school for they do not often visit it. I believe those who do know about it have never seen any evil in it. We can do more and go through more Maneuvers if we only had time but the teacher thought it best to do no dense it as much as possible. Amen.

The Ten Commandments were then sung by the Scholars. The teacher Brother D. E. Pearson then arose and made a few remarks as to the state of the School, after which the audience arose and were dismissed at 5:30 p.m. with prayer by Brother Archer.

Retyped from typed copy by
Norma Jean M. Wood
24 August 1991 1